CAFA Faculty Development Grant


The CAFA Faculty Development Grant aims to support CAFA faculty members in their scholarly pursuit. The grant covers a range of expenses: minor equipment, materials, manuscript preparation, proposal preparation, student hires, and travel to scholarly meetings. The amount awarded to each grant will depend on the proposal and can be at the maximum of $2000. Preference will be given to junior faculty members.

The proposal for the CAFA Faculty Development Grant will consist of a cover page of CAFA faculty development grant application form below and a one-page description of the proposed project (supporting documents such as related publications are optional). The application form below provides the information about the applicant and an estimate of the budget breakdown.

The proposal and a copy of (short) CV should be sent via email to: CAFA Faculty Development Grant Committee, c/o Dr. Elizabeth Budde, Department of Hematology, City of Hope Medical Center,  email to ebudde@coh.org.

The CAFA Development Grant will be presented at the dinner of the CAFA Annual Convention, to be held on Saturday, May 6, 2017 at the Quiet Cannon Restaurant (Tel: (323) 724-4500), 901 Via San Clemente, Montebello, CA 90640-1610. The recipient of the grant must be present for the award, and is expected to become the CAFA member, pay for the dinner event, $50 (see dinner menu for details, formal receipt and/or invoice will be provided upon request). The awardee has to file a report relating to the grant within fourteen months in order to  receive the funding upon receiving the final report.

The deadline for proposal is Saturday, April 22, 2017.  Please email your completed application form and related information to CAFA Faculty Development Grant Committee

Dr. Elizabeth Budde,
President and Chair of CAFA Scholarship Committee
Department of Hematology, City of Hope Medical Center
E-mail:  ebudde@coh.org


CAFA Faculty Development Grant Application Form

Project Title:

Has the project ever been supported by other grants? Yes ___ No ___

Applicant Name:

Rank: Lecturer __ Assistant __ Associate __

Department/School:

Institution:

Address:

e-mail:

Telephone (business/home):

Total Budget:

Breakdown of Budget:


 2015 recipients

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The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

CAFA received excellent proposals covering several fields.  All the proposals deserve recognition and financial assistance.  Due to funding limitation, we are only able to fund the following five most meritorious proposals.

  1. Ming Lee Tang, Department of Chemistry, UC Riverside

Project title: An upconverting hybrid platform for transforming bioimaging

  1. Jiaming Xie, School of Pharmacy, USC

Project title: Mechanistic Studies of CAR T-Cell Recognition and Activation

  1. Huiyan Ma, Division of Cancer Etiology, Dept. of Population Sciences, City of Hope

Project title: Recreational physical activity and ovarian cancer risk in the California Teachers

  1. Joseph Chao, Medical Oncology and Therapeutic Research, City of Hope

Project title: Correlating Genome Wide Copy Number Alterations with MicroRNA Expression Profiling in Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinomas

  1. Ben Hung Ping Shih, Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, City of Hope

Project title: Define the Competence Windows for the Generation of Pancreatic Endocrine Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

 


 2014 recipients

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The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Yong Zhang, 張勇 Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California

Structure and regulatory mechanisms of DNMT1-mediated epigenetic inheritance

ADP-ribosylation has been shown to be essential in regulating a variety of biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, DNA methylation, and signaling transduction. Aberrant ADP-ribosylation catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. Nonetheless, the oncogenic functions of ART and its molecular mechanisms in promoting tumor cell survival, growth and development have remain elusive. To elucidate the roles of ART in cancer pathogenesis, a comprehensive and systematic understanding of the ART-associated interaction network in the context of proliferating cancer cells is required. Our proposed study is aimed at delineating ART-mediated signaling pathways on a cell-type specific basis, which will provide knowledge for understanding the importance and roles of ART in cancer biology and lead to the development of new anti-cancer drugs.  The long-term goals include discovery of novel therapeutic targets, elucidation of the post-translational modification network regulated by ART enzymes, and generation of new chemotherapeutic agents targeting ART and its interaction partners.

Lyna Luo, 羅蕴 Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences

Rational Design of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitors

The formation and growth of bones and cartilages are tightly controlled by several growth factors called “bone morphogenetic proteins” (BMP). Mutations in the genes coding for BMP receptors are linked to severe pathologies including cancer, Cowden’s disease, and pulmonary hypertension. Among them, mutations affecting a subtype of BMP receptor, ALK2 (Activin-Like Kinase-2), are responsible for the development of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), also called Stone Man syndrome, in which muscles are slowly replaced by hard bone tissue. There is presently no treatment to prevent or cure this disease. In this project, we will apply computational molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to investigate 1) how the FOP mutations affect the structure and function of ALK2 kinase and 2) how to design novel and selective ALK2 inhibitor to block the overactive BMP signaling that causes the aberrant bone formation in FOP. Successful completion of this project is expected to guide the development of ALK2 inhibitors with high selectivity and pharmaceutical properties for the treatment of FOP and other heterotopic ossification disorders.

Matthew Mei, 梅敬業 Assistant Professor, Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope

Development of a therapeutic platform for management of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly morbid disease with a poor long-term outcome.  While allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) represents a potentially curative treatment, the relapse rate after allo-SCT remains substantial.  Unfortunately, the outcome of patients with AML who have relapsed after allo-SCT is dismal with the vast majority of patients succumbing to their illness within a few months.  At the moment, there is no standard approach for AML which has relapsed after allo-SCT.  We are aiming to explore the biology of AML which has relapsed after allo-SCT as well as develop a post-transplant therapeutic platform based on hypomethylating agents (HMA) which can be expanded upon in the future with the addition of other novel agents.  First, we are planning a retrospective study with an aim towards establishing a baseline for clinical outcomes including overall survival and amount of time on therapy for patients who have received HMA post allo-SCT.  We are also in the process of designing a prospective study featuring a HMA backbone in conjunction with novel agents for patients with relapsed disease.  As part of the prospective study, a number of biological correlative studies will be conducted focusing on the mutational landscape and gene expression of AML prior to transplant and then subsequently after relapse.  In particular, acquired mutations and changes in gene expression profiling found post relapse will help us understand the biological mechanisms which lie behind relapse and immune escape.


 2013 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Chiaoyun Kuo, Associate Director, Consulting Center, International Center of Regulatory Science, Regulatory Science Program, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California

The Global Landscape of Natural Drugs in Clinical Development

Natural drugs have been the focus of innovative drug development for they hold much promise for new therapies against many devastating diseases, including dementia and cancer. The proposed project, titled “The Global Landscape of Natural Drugs in Clinical Development” is to tackle the challenge of visualizing the clinical trial landscape of natural drugs. Data queried from the public Clinicaltrials.gov registry and database will be first confirmed its relevance, followed by analysis on sponsor/site identities and demographic significance. Clinical approval and marketing trends for this new class of drugs are deduced and validated in light of regional laws and regulations.  We wish to conclude this project with tested and viable development strategies for natural drugs interested to all stakeholders, pharmaceutical industry and the general public alike.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Elizabeth Budde, Assistant Professor, Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT), City of Hop

Targeting CD123 using chimeric antigen receptor T cells for acute myeloid leukemia treatment

Acute myloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults and has the highest death rate of all leukemias. In this proposal, we will evaluate CD123-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CD123 CAR) transduced T cell adoptive immunotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory AML to obtain feasibility, safety and preliminary efficacy data of this treatment. This phase I study will also provide us a unique opportunity to gain valuable scientific knowledge on the biological impact of CAR T cells, which in return will guide the design of the next generation of CD123 CAR T cells.  Based on our pilot observation of the interaction between CD123 CAR T cells and AML blasts, preclinical study will also be conducted to potentially enhance CD123 CAR T cell function and anti-tumor activity by blocking key immune inhibitory checkpoints. We believe this approach has the potential to improve the remission rate and serve as an effective salvage treatment to bridge patients to receive curative allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Jijun Hao, Assistant Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences

BMP signaling and chemoresistance of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States, and its development is initially driven by androgen signaling. Although androgen-deprivation therapy is effective for most patients with advanced prostate cancer, it is inevitable that the disease will eventually progress to androgen-independent prostate cancer which generally requires chemotherapy. However, almost all the patients who initially respond to the chemotherapy will develop chemo-resistance within about one year. Currently, the mechanism underlying chemoresistance of prostate cancer is poorly understood, and effective therapies to overcome the chemoresistance are not available. The goal of this proposal is to help address these issues by studying bone morphogenetic protein signaling in chemoresistance of prostate cancer.


 2012 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Jikui Song, Assistant Professor, Biochemistry Department, University of California, Riverside

Structure and regulatory mechanisms of DNMT1-mediated epigenetic inheritance

Our long-term goal is to provide a comprehensive understanding of how the DNA methylation machinery is regulated and the relationship of this regulation to DNA methylation patterns and human disease processes. The objective of this application is to determine the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the DNMT1 MTase domain, and to identify the roles of the DNMT1 N-terminal domains and other proteins in regulating the enzymatic function of DNMT1. Our central hypothesis is that the enzymatic function of DNMT1 is orchestrated by a multifaceted regulation. We formulate this hypothesis, in part, based on our preliminary data demonstrating that the enzymatic activity of DNMT1 is regulated via a multi-layered mechanism. We will employ biochemical, molecular biological and structural approaches to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of DNMT1, with focus on two specific aims: 1) Illustrate the molecular basis underlying the substrate preference of the DNMT1 MTase domain; and 2) Reveal the intramolecular regulatory mechanism of DNMT1.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Yong Xue Gan, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona

Fundamental studies on the combined effect of thermotherapy and chemotherapy for early-stage cancers using functionalized composite nanotubes

The objective of this project is to explore the feasibility of combining chemotherapy with hyperthermia in early-stage cancer treatments using functionalized multilayered nanotubes. Adjuvant administration of chemical therapy with hyperthermia in cancer treatments has been proposed for years, but their simultaneous delivery through the same treatment source has not been reported. In this research, fundamental studies to determine the feasibility of the development and implementation of a new thermo-chemotherapy core-shell nanotube seed that consists of an encapsulated drug delivery core with a ferromagnetic shell. When implanted in tissue and inducted by a controlled external electromagnetic field, the shell of the nanotube seed will self-regulate heat output. The combination of an electromagnetic field and a self-regulating heat feature will preclude the need for invasive thermometry and ease heat delivery, especially to deep-seated tumors. This is especially suitable for treating early stage cancers because the damage to normal tissue could be controlled at the minimum level. The ferromagnetic shell will be iron oxide or nickel oxide loaded titanium dioxide nanotubes made from electrochemical oxidation of titanium. Drugs for chemotherapy will be injected into the nanotube. Delivering the drug will be realized by the induction heating of the shell at the onset of cancer therapy. The shell of the seed could also be used for thermal treatment of a tumor. If the project is successful, the nanotube seed could serve as a sensitizer to systemic therapies without another invasive procedure.


 2011 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Huiwang Ai — Genetically Encoded Biosensors for Hydrogen Sulfide

Dr. Huiwang Ai is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Riverside.

His research interests lie at the interfaces between chemistry and biology. In particular, he employs protein engineering and synthetic chemistry, coupled with light microscopy, to investigate cell signaling pathways. The goal of the proposed research is to develop genetically encoded fluorescent protein based probes for the selective detection of live-cell hydrogen sulfide, a toxin and also an important cell-signaling molecule. Funds are requested to purchase chemicals, enzymes, molecular biology kits and cell culture reagents that are required for this research. Dr. Ai received B.S. in Chemistry from Tsinghua University in 2003, and Ph.D. in Chemical Biology from the University of Alberta, Canada in 2008. After his postdoctoral work at The Scripps Research Institute, he joined the faculty at the UC Riverside in July 2011.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Patrick Chan — Development of Depressive-Like Behavior in Animals with Substance Abuse

Dr. Patrick Chan is an Assistant Professor at the Western University.

Approximately 18.8 million Americans suffer one major depressive episode a year, resulting in an economic burden of $83 billion. Adults suffering from major depression are twice as likely to seek illicit drug use. Furthermore, treatment of both illnesses concurrently, i.e., depression in substance abusers or substance abuse in depressed patients, is substantially more daunting. While the role of the neurotransmitter serotonin in depression and drug addiction each has been studied in great detail independently, there is currently no evidence linking behavioral symptoms of depression associated with cocaine withdraw with actual chemical changes in critical brain regions in the pathology of both disorders. This research proposal seeks to examine serotonin dysfunction and its associated symptoms during withdrawal from cocaine use. The forced swim test and microdialysis in freely moving mice, two well-established approaches, will be employed to obtain behavioral and chemical data, respectively, to examine the pathogenesis of depression in mice suffering from cocaine addiction. The proposed studies will provide valuable information on serotonergic changes associated with behavioral manifestations. This may lead to further investigations of other brain chemicals. Taken altogether, future goals include translation of this information into the clinical setting for more rational medication development for the treatment and prevention of patients suffering from depression while going through drug withdrawal.


2010 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Chi On Chui — Highly Sensitive and Rapid Diagnostic Devices for Cardiovascular Disease

Professor Chi On Chui is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. The proposed research project aims to develop point-of-care devices for highly sensitive and real-time diagnosis of cardiovascular disease such as acute myocardial infarction. The transformative amplifying nanowire field-effect transistor sensor concept will maximize the intrinsic detection sensitivity with minimal noise contribution. Funds are requested to purchase surface immobilization chemicals and cardiac biomarker antibody solutions, and support professional travels specific to the project. Dr. Chui received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, CA. After which he joined Intel Corporation as a Senior Device Engineer and Research-in-Residence at UC Berkeley and Stanford.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Mei Kong — Identify Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cell Adaptation to Metabolic Stress

Dr. Mei Kong is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Tumor Cell Biology at the Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope Cancer Center. The proposed research project seeks to define signaling pathways regulating cell survival under metabolic stress, how these pathways function in cancer progression and means to target these pathways as cancer treatment. Funds are requested to purchase chemicals, antibodies and real-time qPCR reagents that are required for this research. Dr. Kong received B.S. in Biology from East China Normal University, her M.S. in Cell Biology from Shanghai Institute of Cell Biology and Ph.D. in Experimental Medicine from McGill University, Canada. She did her postdoctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania.


2009 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Weiming Yuan — Modeling of the Ligand-Receptor Association

Professor Weiming Yuan is an Assistant Professor Professor of Molecular Biology and Immunology at USC Keck School of Medicine. The proposal requests funding for paying animal housing, biochemicals and cell lines. This project is aimed to establish a research program that develop novel approaches to treat cancers. Dr. Yuan received his B.S. and M.S. in Biochemistry from the Fudan University in China and his Ph.D. in Molecular Virology from University of Texas at Austin. He had pursued postdoctoral studies at UT-Austin and Yale University.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Yu Huang — Multifunctional Upconversion NanoParticles for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

Dr. Yu Huang is an Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. The proposal requests funding for paying materials and professional travel. The proposed research project is aimed at developing nanoparticles for photodynamic cancer therapy which is emerging as a promising approach for cancer therapy, in which light activates photosensitizers (the drugs), which then function as catalysts to convert molecular oxygent to a range of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells. Dr. Huang received B.S. in Chemistry from University of Science and Technology in China and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Harvard University in 2003. She did her postdoctoral work at MIT.


2008 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Chia-en Angelina Chang — Modeling of the Ligand-Receptor Association

Professor Chia-en Angelina Chang is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside. The proposed project aims to develop reliable and efficient tools for modeling molecular recognition. The new methods will enable detailed calculation of ligand-receptor binding kinetics and thermodynamics and will speed the discovery of new medications. Funds are requested to purchase computer hardware and software that are required for this research. Dr. Chang received her Ph.D. degree in Physical Chemistry from University of Maryland, College Park. She competed her postdoctoral training at the Howard Hughes Medical Research Institute and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCSD.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Min-Ming Wen — Credit Default Swaps: Risk Management or Risk-Taking for Insurance Industry

Professor Min-Ming Wen is an Assistant Professor at the College of Business and Economics, California State University, Los Angeles. This project aims to thoroughly investigate whether the use of credit default swaps (CDS) can effectively hedge risks or potentially motivate insurers to take more risks. This objective is particularly relevant and interesting, since the recent financial crisis has been attributed to the heavy use of credit default swaps, and has drawn the attention of regulators to the practice of CDS in insurance industry. Funds are requested to support the travel expenses and the purchase of NAIC reports that are required for this research. Dr. Wen received Ph.D. degree in Finance from the University of Connecticut.

Ching-Ling (Ellen) Lien — PDGF signaling in new coronary blood vessel formation during zebrafish heart regeneration

Professor Ching-Ling (Ellen) Lien is an Assistant Professor at Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. The proposed research project aims to determine how PDGF signaling regulates the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of epicardium that contributes to new coronary blood vessel formation during zebrafish heart regeneration. Funds are requested to purchase supplies and materials that are required for this research and to support Dr. Lien’s participation in the Weinstein Cardiovascu39lar meeting. Dr. Lien received her Ph.D. degree in Genetics and Developmental Biology from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital of Boston.


2007 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Yadong Yin — Shape Control of Nanocrystals by Wet Chemical Etching

Professor Yadong Yin is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside. This project aims to develop a wet chemical etching method to control the shape of nanocrystalline materials. Uniform spherical nanocrystals will be first synthesized using existing methods, and then chemically etched to form new shapes as the result of different etching rates on different crystal facets. New physical properties (e.g. optical, magnetic and electronic properties) will emerge along with the novel geometric shapes. This proposal asks for funds to help generating preliminary results for a full grant application. Dr. Yin was a staff scientist at the Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, before he arrived in UCR in 2006.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Jun Wu — Establish Novel Multiple Myeloma Orthotopic Xenograft Model for Preclinical Studies

Dr. Jun Wu is an Assistant Research Scientist at the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center. The proposal asks for funding to purchase materials and supplies for this research. Multiple myeloma (MM) is currently an incurable B cell malignancy that accounts for 10% of human hematopoietic malignancies. The delay in therapeutic development for MM is mainly because of the lack of suitable animal model of MM that can faithfully recapitulate the nature characters of the disease in vivo for better understanding the molecular and cellular mechanism, and pre-clinical assessment of novel chemotherapy. This project involves the development of an animal model that will provide novel humanized bone marrow microenvironment for the growth ofxenografted primary human MM cells, and a noninvasive monitoring opportunity to observe the sequential initiation, progression, metastasis events and drug response of the natural development of MM. Dr. Wu was a research fellow at the University of Southern California before he became a member of the City of Hope in 2007.

Shinyi Wu — Coaching Healthcare Providers for Improving Chronic Care and Business Strategies in the Safety Net

Professor Shinyi Wu is an Assistant Professor at the Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California. This proposal asked for funding to purchase the software and literature review on coaching interventions, supporting the project funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Dr. Wu’s research will develop, test, and disseminate a toolkit and practice coaching strategy to help safety-net practices implement the Chronic Care Model in a sustainable, efficient way. Dr. Wu arrived at USC in January 2008. Prior to joining USC, she was a researcher in the RAND Corporation’s Health Program and Technology & Applied Sciences Group.


2006 recipients

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The Robert T. Poe Faculty Development Grant

Chun Ning “Jeanie” Lau — Superconductivity and Quantum Coherence in Nanoscale Systems

Dr. Chun Ning “Jeanie” Lau is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside. The proposal asks for funding to pay for liquid helium, evaporation metal sources and clean room fees. This project aims to establish a research program that explores and exploits novel phenomena in nanoscale systems induced by superconducting coherence. Dr. Lau received her B.A. in Physics from the University of Chicago, her M.A. and Ph.D. in the same discipline from Harvard University.

The CAFA Faculty Development Grant

Bangyan Stiles — The Effect of Activating AMPK on Pten Deletion Induced Liver Carcinogenesis

Dr. Bangyan Stiles is an Assistant Professor at the School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California. The proposed research project aims to test whether activating an energy signaling pathway can inhibit or delay liver cancer development in a mouse model. Funds are requested to purchase a homogenizer with a sawtooth generator that is required for this research. Dr. Stiles received her B.S. in Food Chemistry from Jinan University, her M.S. in Nutrition from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville and her Ph.D. in Nutritional Biochemistry from the University of Texas-Austin/MD Anderson Cancer Center. She completed two postdoctoral fellowships at the Howard Hughes Medical Research Institute and UCLA School of Medicine.

Ying Huang — Biosynthesis of Ethylmalonyl-CoA in Streptomyces Melanosporus

Dr. Ying Huang is an Assistant Professor at the College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences. This proposal asked for funding to purchase tumor samples, cDNA and PCR reagents. The project is to investigate the role of the KEAP1-NRF2-SLC7A11 pathway in the resistance of malignant mesothelioma to chemotherapy. Dr. Huang received her B.S. in Medicine from Beijing Medical University, her M.S. in Medicine from the Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine, and her Ph.D. in Molecular Genomics from the Ohio State University. She completed two postdoctoral trainings from the Ohio State University and Harvard Medical School.


2005 recipients

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Kylie Hsu – A Linguistic Study of Chinese Spoken Discourse

The proposal asks for funding to pay for student assistance and the purchase of the Adobe Photoshop CS2 software. This project involves audio/video recording, transcribing, and illustrating spoken Chinese discourse/conversations. It is for an invited monograph entitled, ¡§Pragmatic Functions of Shuo in Chinese Spoken Discourse,¡¨ to be published by the Edwin Mellen Press, an international publisher that specializes in publishing Chinese linguistic studies. Dr. Hsu is an Associate Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, California State University, Los Angeles. She received her B.A. in Linguistics (Summa Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, her M.A. in Linguistics (Distinction) from California State University, Northridge, and her Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics (Presidential Fellow) from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Wendong Huang – Rejuvenate Aged Liver by A Nuclear Receptor Mediated Signaling Pathway

The proposed research project aims to study the molecular mechanism involved in liver regeneration after injury. Funds are requested to purchase mice, chemicals and antibodies that are required for this research. Dr. Huang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gene Regulation and Drug Discovery, the Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope. He received his B.S. in Biology from Zhejiang University in 1991, his M.S. in Biophysics from Zhejiang University in 1994, and his Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics from University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in 2000.

Sheryl Tsai – Structure-based Inhibitor Design: Towards the Therapeutics for Tuberculosis and Cancer

This proposal asked for funding to purchase the software license ICM-Pro that is for a drug design project in Dr. Tsai’s laboratory. The project is to design drugs for treating tuberculosis. Dr. Tsai is an Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry at University of California, Irvine. She received her B.S. in Organic Synthesis from National Taiwan University in 1990, her M.S. in Organic Synthesis from National Taiwan University in 1992, and her Ph.D. in Biochemistry & Organic Synthesis from University of California, Berkeley in 1999.


2004 recipients

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Huei-chu (Pearl) Chen — Project-Based learning with Technology

This proposal asks for funding to develop a book proposal and several chapter drafts with a working title of Project Based Learning with Technology. Dr. Huei Chu Chen is an Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology in the Division of Applied and Advance Studies in Education at California State University, Los Angeles. She received her BS in Horticulture from Chinese Culture University in 1984, MS in Secondary Education in 1992 and Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Kansas State University in 1999.

Wenkuang Chang — Virtual Learning Environment for Oral Skills

This proposal attempts to build a multimedia system which allows language instructors to create speaking exercises on-line without the installation or configuration of any sound recording programs. Prof. Wenkuang Chang is currently a lecturer of East Asian Languages and Cultures at University of Southern California. He received his BS in Geology from National Taiwan University in 1992, and MA in Applied Linguistics from University of Houston in 1996.

Peter Z. Qin — Site -Directed Spin Labeling Studies of the Packaging RNA, an Esential Component in the Strongest Known Biological Motor

The proposed project is to determine the low-resolution structure of pRNA complexes utilizing distance constrains obtained from SDSL, and to investigate interaction between ATP and pRNA. Dr. Peter Z. Qin is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at University of Southern California. He received his BS in Physics from Peking University in 1991, Ph.D. in Biophysics from Columbia University in 1999, and served as a postdoctoral fellow at University of California, Los Angeles from 1999-2002.

Feng Xiao — How do Chinese Firms Finance Investment and Growth? An Empirical Investigation

This proposed research project aims to empirically investigate how firms in China finance their investment needs and corporate growth, and what specific factors determine the resulting capital structures of these firms. Dr. Feng Xiao is an Assistant Professor of Economics at California State University, Fullerton. She received her BA in Economics from Fudan University in 1992, MA in Economics in 1998 and Ph.D. in Economics from University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 2003.


2003 recipients

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Monica Her — The optimal state ownership in China’s Privatization

Dr. Monica Her is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Finance, Real Estate, and Insurance, College of Business and Economics, California State University, Northridge. This study plans to investigate the ownership structure of the Chinese State-owned enterprises (SOEs). With the opening up of the Chinese capital market, the results of our study may provide significant implications not only to the government policy makers but also to the general public who are interested to participate in the market.

Hui-shu Lee — Behind the Screen and Beyond: Chinese Imperial Women’s Patronage and Practice of Art in the Song Dynasty (960-1279)

Dr. Hui-shu Lee is an Assistant professor at the Department of Art History, University of California, Los Angeles. The project is a book that examines Chinese imperial women as patrons and practitioners of the arts through the Song Dynasty, one of the greatest periods of cultural development in the history of China, and one in which imperial patronage plays a prominent role. Dr. Lee hopes to submit to a publisher in the autumn of 2004.

Clay C.C. Wang — Biosynthesis of Ethylmalonyl-CoA in Streptomyces Melanosporus

Dr. Clay C.C. Wang is an Assistant Professor at Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences,USC School of Pharmacy. A major part of this research program at USC school of pharmacy involves understanding how pharmaceutically relevant natural products are biosynthesized by Streptomyces bacteria. Development of natural products as pharmaceutical drugs often suffers from scarcity from natural sources and difficulty in creating analogues.

Mitchell Wong — Racial Disparities in Disease and Mortality

Dr. Mitchell Wong is an Assistant professor at Department of Internal Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, UCLA Division of GIM/HSR. The overall goal of the project is to identify the areas of health that contribute most to the disparities in life expectancy between African Americans and whites.


2002 recipients

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Zhengyuan (Danial) Xu – Study of Ultra Wideband Wireless Communication Systems

Dr. Xu is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside. His research interests include wireless communication and networking, and advanced signal processing for communications. He worked in the Tsinghua Unisplendour Group Corp. of Tsinghua University, China for five years. Dr. Xu received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology, NJ, B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electronic Engineering from Tsinghua University, China.

Jun Yan – An Empirical Study of Leaders’ Contribution to the Collective Entrepreneurship of Small Mainland-Chinese Private Business Firms

Dr. Yan is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Management/HRM, California State University, Long Beach. His research interests focus on cross culture management, Chinese family-business, entrepreneurship, and leadership. Dr. Yan was born in Beijing, China. He received his Ph.D. in Management from Texas Tech University, M.S. in International Business from Nanjing University of Science and Technology, and his B.S. in Systems Engineering from East China Institute of Technology. He worked as an international business manager in China North Industries Corporation (NORINCO) for four years. Both his parents were professors in China University of Geo-science.


2001 recipients

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Sulin Ba – Analysis and Experiment of an Online Bundle Voting Mechanism

Dr. Sulin Ba is an Assistant Profess or of Information Systems at the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California. Her research interests focus on the design of trust building intermediaries that facilitate electronic market transactions. Her work on the institutional setup to help small business survive and grow in the digital economy has been used as the basis for testimony before the Congressional House Committee on Small Business. She has published in Management Science, MIS Quarterly, Decision Support Systems, and other academic journals. Dr. Ba received her Ph.D. and Master’s Degree in Management Information Systems from the University of Texas at Austin and her B.A. in Library and Information Sciences from Zhongshan University in China.

Jyan-Yu Austin Yang – Sphingomyelin Hydrolysis and Regulation of Amyloid Turn-Over in Alzheimer’s Disease

Dr. Austin Yang is an Assistant Professor at the School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California. His research interest is to study the effect of amyloid peptides on neuronal cell death during the course of Alzheimer’s disease; and this project is currently supported by both the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer’s Association. Dr. Yang received his Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from University of California, Irvine and his B.S. in Biology from National Taiwan University. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, New York University for three years.

Yunxia Lisa Wang – Development of Seismic Design Guidelines of Lifeline Infrastructures

Dr. Wang is an assistant professor at the Department of Civil Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Her professional interests are in the research of liquid- structure interaction on liquid storage structures and in the design of buildings and bridges for earthquake and wind loading. She worked in an engineering consulting firm Boyle Engineering Corporation in Newport Beach. Dr. Wang received her Ph.D. in Structural and Earthquake Engineering from University of California, Irvine, M.S. in Geotechnical Engineering from China Academy of Railway Sciences, and B.S. in Civil Engineering from Southwest Jiaotong University.


2000 recipients

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Eddie Hak-sing Ip – Development of Web-based Tera-byte Sharing System to Support Long Distance Collaborative Research

Dr. Ip is an assistant professor of Information and Operations Management Sciences at the Marshall School of Business at USC. He received both his B. Sc. in math and a Postgraduate Certificate in software engineering from the Hong Kong University and his Ph. D. in statistics from Stanford University.

Winnie Wai-ming Kung – Mental Health Needs and Help Seeking Behaviors of Chinese Americans

Dr. Kung is an assistant professor at the School of Social Work at USC. She received her Ph. D. in Social Work from the University of Chicago, her M.S.W. from Washington University in St. Louis, and her B. Soc. Sc. in Social work and Sociology from the University of Hong Kong.

Ching-an Peng – Ultrasonic Standing Wave Manipulation of Retroviral Gene Delivery to Hematopoietic Stem Cells

Dr. Peng has been an assistant professor of Chemical Engineering at USC since 1997. He received his B. Sc. from the National Taiwan University, his M. S. from the University of Notre Dame, and his Ph. D. from the University of Michigan. In 1996-1997, he was a post-doctoral fellow at StemCell Technologies Inc., in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Lan-ying Tseng – Representing Heaven: Art and Visual Culture in Early China

Dr. Tseng is an assistant professor with joint appointment in the Department of Art History and of East Asian Languages & Cultures at USC. She received her Ph. D. in the History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University in 2000 and her BA and MA from the National Taiwan University in 1988 and 1992, respectively. In 1997-98, she was a visiting assistant curator of the Gallery of Historical Relics, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan.


1999 recipients

List Recipients

Bo Hong – Supramolecular System for Unimolecular Light Harvesting

Dr. Bo Hong is an assistant professor of Chemistry at UC, Irvine since 1995. She received her BS in Chemistry from Fudan University in 1985, Ph. D. in Chemistry from Texas A&M University in 1993, and served as a postdoctoral fellow at University of Texas from 1993-95.

Horng Yi Lee – Development of Audio-Visual Aids for a Textbook of Beginning Chinese

Dr. Horing Yi Lee is currently a lecturer of Modern Languages & Literature at California State University, Los Angeles. She received her BA in Chinese Literature from National Chengchi University in Taiwan, MA in Chinese Literature and Ph. D. in Educational Psychology and Technology from University of Southern California.

Jingsong Zhang – Study of Atmospheric Chemistry of Nitrous Acid using Cavity Ring-Down Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

Dr. Jingsong Zhang is an assistant professor of Chemistry at UC, Riverside since 1996. He received his BS in Chemistry from USTC in 1987, Ph. D. in Chemistry from UC, Berkeley and served as a postdoctoral fellow at University of Southern California from 1993-96.